The Canonical Brady Bunch Episode Guide

Version 2.01, 20 Feb 2004

Copyright (C) 1994-2009 by Tony L. Hill. All rights reserved.

Winner of the first 1998 Silver Platter Award

Fun and exciting trivia contest

Series creator Sherwood Schwartz and his son and series producer Lloyd Schwartz have written a book about the origin and making of "The Brady Bunch," Brady, Brady, Brady. We are offering a free copy of the book to the winner of this trivia contest. If there is still a tie after the tie-breaker question, the winner will be chosen by lot. The contest closes November 2, 2010. Please e-mail your entries to ruff-68211@mypacks.net. Void where prohibited, restricted, or taxed.

To learn more about the book, go here: http://www.bradybradybrady.com

  1. In an episode of the short-lived series "The Brady Brides," Jan and Marcia and their husbands appeared on "The Newlywed Game." In the book, Lloyd Schwartz relates how the host of the show appeared on an episode of "The Brady Brides" but was not an experienced dramatic actor. Who was this long-running game show host?
  2. Lloyd Schwartz tells how a well-known actor (previously a co-star with Robert Reed on another series) was hired to play Marcia's principal who punishes her for drawing an unflattering picture of her teacher. Who was this actor?
  3. The story of Marcia getting into trouble for her drawing was based on the real-life experience of Sherwood Schwartz. As in the story, he protested (just as Marcia did) that the drawing was really of a historic American. Who did Marcia (and Sherwood) draw?
  4. Which Brady character dreamed about being a basketball star on another planet?
  5. In the episode "And Now a Word from Our Sponsor," the Bradys are cast in a TV commercial by a wacky director played by Paul Winchell. Lloyd Schwartz tells that filming of the scene outside the supermarket was delayed because there was a dead body in the parking lot and he didn't want the children to see it. What type of product was the commercial for?
  6. In one of the three episodes set in Hawaii, a tarantula crawled on one of the Brady children. Lloyd Schwartz reveals that two tarantulas were used for the filming: one living, one dead. What Brady child had to endure this?
  7. Which Brady character invented an ailing aunt in Seattle, Sacramento, Saskatchewan, or Siberia?
  8. Lloyd Schwartz maintains that in filming the episode "A Room at the Top," a scene in which two characters sat and talked on a bed had to be repeatedly reshot because the obvious romantic attraction between the two was coming through. Which two Brady children were arguing over the attic bedroom?
  9. Which Brady character faked a lame leg to get out of a school play?
  10. In a three-part third season opener, the Bradys visited a well-known American landmark. However, little of the episode was actually filmed there, with the rest being filmed on location in the Los Angeles area. In what national park was the episode set?
  11. In the first episode of that three-part season opener, the Bradys were locked up and their car was stolen by a character played by Jim Backus, who formerly had co-starred on an earlier TV classic created and produced by Sherwood Schwartz. What was that 1960s TV comedy?
  12. Lloyd Schwartz threw a football into the face of Marcia Brady (played by Maureen McCormick) in making the episode "The Subject Was Noses." What three word phrase did Marcia utter at the end of this shot?
  13. Which Brady character invented a boyfriend named George Glass?
  14. During the filming of the series' last episode, "The Hair-Brained Scheme," Sherwood Schwartz decided that if the show was renewed for a sixth season (which it was not), one of the cast members would be replaced. Who?
  15. Which Brady character was replaced by an understudy in a school production of "Romeo and Juliet"?
  16. In casting "The Dropout," Lloyd Schwartz invited a number of major league baseball players to appear in the episode before finding one who agreed. Who was this Hall of Fame pitcher?
  17. What did Jan crash into with her bicycle in the Brady garage while not wearing her glasses?
  18. According to Lloyd Schwartz, the 5th season opener was supposed to be "Snow White and the Seven Bradys," but its airing was delayed for a few weeks while the producers waited for permission from another Hollywood studio to use the names of the dwarfs. What studio grudgingly agreed to let the Bradys call the characters Sleepy, Grumpy, Bashful, Doc, Dopey, Sneezy, and Happy?
  19. The actual 5th season opener turned out to be one in which an agent tried to lure Greg away from the singing act the six Brady children had with the promise of a solo career. What stage name did the agent give Greg?
  20. In making "The Personality Kid," Lloyd Schwartz taught Peter (Christopher Knight) to imitate a Hollywood legend the way he might have uttered the phrase "pork chops and applesauce." Who was this star of "Casablanca," whom Lloyd claims Chris had not previously heard of?
  21. Tie-breaker: Sherwood Schwartz claims that Mike Lookinland turned down the chance to be the title character on another series, in part because his parents thought it would be better for him to be in a show with five other children instead of being the only child. What was this short-lived series, based on a 1963 feature film, that instead cast Brandon Cruz as the title character?

Premiere: September 26, 1969
Last original episode: March 8, 1974
Last show of the series: August 30, 1974
Entered syndication: September 1975
The Brady Bunch was also shown on ABC daytime in June, July, and August of 1973, 1974, and 1975.

REGULAR CAST:
Robert Reed (Michael Brady)
Florence Henderson (Carol Tyler Martin Brady)
Barry Williams (Gregory Brady)
Maureen McCormick (Marcia Martin Brady)
Christopher Knight (Peter Brady)
Eve Plumb (Jan Martin Brady)
Mike Lookinland (Robert Brady)
Susan Olsen (Cynthia Martin Brady)
Ann B. Davis (Alice Nelson)


Guide to the author's ratings


An out-of-this-world groovy episode.
Above average
Typical Brady fare
Not quite as good as it should have been
Why did they make it?

EPISODE 1 - The Honeymoon (26 September 1969)
Written by: Sherwood Schwartz; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: Mike and Carol are married in a backyard ceremony and then take off on their honeymoon, but find themselves worrying about their children.

GUEST CAST:
Dabbs Greer (Minister)
James Millhollin (Mr. Pringle)
J. Pat O'Malley (Mr. Tyler)
Joan Tompkins (Mrs. Tyler)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A charming and well-rounded introduction to the Bradys and the Martins.

WHO'S WHO: Dabbs Greer has played many ministers on TV; in addition to this episode, he played the minister who married Bobby and Tracy in The Bradys; he married the Petries on The Dick Van Dyke Show, and he had a regular role as a minister on both Little House on the Prairie and Picket Fences.


EPISODE 2 - Dear Libby (3 October 1969)
Written by: Lois Hire; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: The whole family suspects the worst when a letter appears in an advice column from someone unhappy with a new marriage involving three children from previous marriages on each side.

GUEST CAST:
Jo De Winter (Dear Libby)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Introduces the idea that a crisis in the Brady household will affect every member. It's absurd to believe that a columnist would break confidentiality, let alone name the city and state of the letter writer.


EPISODE 3 - Eenie, Meenie, Mommy, Daddy (10 October 1969)
Written by: Joanna Lee; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: Cindy is depressed by having to choose which parent to invite to see her perform the lead in the class play. The other children offer conflicting solutions.

GUEST CAST:
Brian Forster (Elf)
Tracy Reed (Miss Marlowe)
Marjorie Stapp (Mrs. Engstrom)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Very well done. Makes the audience feel Cindy's dilemma perfectly.


EPISODE 4 - Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (17 October 1969)
Written by: Paul West; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: Alice decides the family no longer needs her now that Mike has a new wife and the boys a new mother.

GUEST CAST:
Fred Pinkard (Mr. Stokey)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode exemplifies the importance of Alice as a member of the family and not as an employee.


EPISODE 5 - Katchoo (24 October 1969)
Written by: William Cowley; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: Jan is found to be allergic to something -- either her new dad or the family dog.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The notion that Jan is allergic to Mike is absurd, and got about the amount of play it deserved.

DID YOU KNOW: The original Tiger was killed during the filming of this episode in an car accident away from the set. The producers found a lookalike dog for the final scene. After this, it was decided that Tiger would appear only when needed for the plot.


EPISODE 6 - A Clubhouse Is Not a Home (31 October 1969)
Written by: Skip Webster; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: The boys and girls fight over possession of the boys' backyard clubhouse. (A second clubhouse is built, but neither of them is seen again.)

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The fights among the children in their age-pairs highlight the importance those relationships would take on over the series.


EPISODE 7 - Kitty Karry-All Is Missing (7 November 1969)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Bill Freedman; Directed by: John Rich

SYNOPSIS: Bobby is accused of stealing Cindy's favorite doll, which he had admitted to despising.

GUEST CAST:
Pitt Herbert (Mr. Driscoll)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The plot of this episode is a little thin, but it is one of the best remembered episodes from the first season among fans of the show. The Kitty doll is now one of the most sought-after and pricey Brady collectibles.


EPISODE 8 - A-Camping We Will Go (14 November 1969)
Written by: Herbert Finn and Alan Dinehart; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The boys feel Mike is infringing on their family camping trip tradition by insisting that Carol and the girls accompany them.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The boys' revulsion at the females' domestication of their campsite seems genuine enough.


EPISODE 9 - Sorry, Right Number (21 November 1969)
Written by: Ruth Brooks Flippen; Directed by: George Cahan

SYNOPSIS: After the children run up the phone bill with excessive conversations, Mike decides to install a pay phone for them to use.

GUEST CAST:
Howard Culver (Mr. Crawford)
Allan Melvin (Sam)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The pay phone made for a fun story idea, but why would the kids be making toll calls to their friends?


EPISODE 10 - Every Boy Does It Once (5 December 1969)
Written by: Lois and Arnold Peyser; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Bobby decides Carol is an "evil stepmother" of the fairy-tale variety and chooses to run away from home.

GUEST CAST:
Michael Lerner (Johnny)
Larry McCormick (TV Announcer)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The tremendous comic impact of Carol's having Bobby clean the fireplace is worthy of an LOL.


EPISODE 11 - Vote for Brady (12 December 1969)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: David Alexander

SYNOPSIS: Marcia and Greg compete for student body president and accuse the other of trying to sabotage his or her campaign. Greg lets go of a sure victory by firing his campaign manager for suggesting a smear campaign against Marcia.

GUEST CAST:
Martin Ashe (Mr. Dickens)
Stephen Liss (Rusty)
Casey Morgan (Scott)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The gritty, individualistic nature of politics comes through in this episode.


EPISODE 12 - The Voice of Christmas (19 December 1969)
Written by: John Fenton Murray; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: When Carol loses her voice before Christmas, Cindy tells Santa Claus that all she wants for Christmas is for Carol to get her voice back in time to sing a solo in church.

GUEST CAST:
Hal Smith (Santa Claus)
Carl Albert (Little Boy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes and the best one of the first season.

WHO'S WHO: Hal Smith is most famous for playing Otis the Drunk on The Andy Griffith Show.


EPISODE 13 - Is There a Doctor in the House (26 December 1969)
Written by: Ruth Brooks Flippen; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The boys and girls have serious misgivings about using the services of each others' doctors.

GUEST CAST:
Herbert Anderson (Dr. Cameron)
Marion Ross (Dr. Porter)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A playful and amusing episode, but why was it assumed that the kids would change doctors?

WHO'S WHO: Marion Ross and Herbert Anderson are both famous TV parents. She for Mrs. Cunningham on Happy Days, and he for Mr. Mitchell on Dennis the Menace.


EPISODE 14 - Father of the Year (2 January 1970)
Written by: Skip Webster; Directed by: George Cahan

SYNOPSIS: Marcia gets punished for neglecting her duties, but she's doing it in order to nominate Mike for Father of the Year in a newspaper contest.

GUEST CAST:
Lee Corrigan (Cameraman)
Bob Golden (Mr. Fields)
Oliver McGowan (Hamilton Samuels)
Bill Mullikin (Lance Pierce)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the most heartwarming plots of the series. Mike is truly Marcia's tormentor in this episode, and her persistence in trying to reward him shows her maturity and immaturity at the same time.


EPISODE 15 - 54-40 and Fight (9 January 1970)
Written by: Burt Styler; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The boys and girls squabble over how to spend their respective 54 and 40 books of trading stamps. The situation becomes more urgent when the stamp company announces that it's going out of business.

GUEST CAST:
Herb Vigran (Harry)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The competition between the boys and girls is overdone here. This was a definite first-season trend to show them as warring camps as often as possible. Why the children would need to compete for all the books is not sensible. Why wouldn't they just buy a smaller item than they'd prefer with the books they each had?


EPISODE 16 - Mike's Horror-Scope (16 January 1970)
Written by: Ruth Brooks Flippen; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Mike has to deal with a smothering female client with outrageous demands. Since Mike is working overtime, Carol takes the boys fishing but meets only chaos.

GUEST CAST:
Abbe Lane (Beebe Gallini)
Joe Ross (Duane Cartwright)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is one of the few episodes that tries to focus on the parents. It really doesn't work, and the Beebe character is simply too cartoonish for this episode to be taken seriously.


EPISODE 17 - The Undergraduate (23 January 1970)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Greg is failing math, and Mike and Carol learn it's because he's in love with someone named Linda. They are surprised when they learn who Linda is.

GUEST CAST:
Wes Parker (Himself)
Gigi Perreau (Miss O'Hara)
Teresa Warder (Linda)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode is well done, but the younger Linda must wonder why Carol is taking such an interest in her love life when they've just met. The producers display how they will sneak sports stars into episodes.


EPISODE 18 - Tiger! Tiger! (30 January 1970)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Herb Wallerstein

SYNOPSIS: Tiger is missing, and the children pool their small savings to put up a reward. The family organizes a posse when the dog is sighted, and the reason for his disappearance is revealed.

GUEST CAST:
Gary Grimes (Teenage Boy)
Maggie Malooly (Mrs. Simpson)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The dog's absence doesn't really give enough plot material for an episode, and the weaknesses show in several points.


EPISODE 19 - The Big Sprain (6 February 1970)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: While Carol is out of town, Alice sprains her ankle in an accident caused by the children, leaving Mike and the children to deal with the domestic side of life on their own.

GUEST CAST:
Allan Melvin (Sam)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The idea that Mike is incompetent domestically is overdone in the early seasons.


EPISODE 20 - Brace Yourself (13 February 1970)
Written by: Brad Radnitz; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Marcia is self-conscious when she gets braces, and she suspects they are the reason a date is broken.

GUEST CAST:
John Daniels (Eddie)
Molly Dodd (Saleslady)
Brian Nash (Joey)
Scott Robertson (Alan Anthony)
Jerry Levreau (Harold)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This typical Brady plot exemplifies why the Bunch is such an enduring success, showing the pains of adolescence from the young person's point of view.


EPISODE 21 - The Hero (20 February 1970)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Peter saves a little girl from a falling wall in a toy store, but he takes advantage of her mother's generosity and then lets his newfound status as a hero go to his head.

GUEST CAST:
Joe Conley (Deliveryman)
Pitt Herbert (Mr. Driscoll)
Susan Joyce (Jennifer)
Dave Morick (Earl Hopkins)
Dani Nolan (Mrs. Spencer)
Randy Lane (Steve)
Iler Rasmussen (Jason)
Melanie Baker (Tina Spencer)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode is very well done and makes its moral points without being preachy.


EPISODE 22 - The Possible Dream (27 February 1970)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Bill Freedman; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Marcia's diary is inadvertently given to charity, and the family hunts it down, in order to keep secret Marcia's ambition of marrying Desi Arnaz, Jr.

GUEST CAST:
Desi Arnaz Jr. (Himself)
Jonathan Hole (Thackery)
Gordon Jump (Collins)
Pat Patterson (Collection Man)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode strains suspension of disbelief in several places -- Alice is really friends with Lucille Ball's housekeeper? -- in order to introduce a celebrity.


EPISODE 23 - To Move or Not to Move (6 March 1970)
Written by: Paul West; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Mike and Carol decide to sell the house and buy a bigger one, but the kids decide they don't mind sharing bedrooms, and set out to sabotage the sale to a prospective buyer.

GUEST CAST:
Fran Ryan (Mrs. Hunsaker)
C. Lindsay Workman (Bertram Grossman)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is a fun episode to watch. The kids are clever enough to sabotage the showing, but they are infantile enough to think wearing a sheet like a ghost will scare off a buyer?


EPISODE 24 - The Grass Is Always Greener (13 March 1970)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: George Cahan

SYNOPSIS: Mike and Carol each claim that shepherding boys and girls, respectively, is easier than the other. They switch roles one Saturday in order to prove the point.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode's failure is focusing too much on the parents, something that counters the show's franchise of writing the scripts from the children's point of view. Once again, the dated and sexist notion that the parents are incompetent in each other's milieus is overdone.

DID YOU KNOW? Robert Reed really slipped on an egg as Mike did while rehearsing the scene. He was out to prove that no one could slip on an egg that way.


EPISODE 25 - Lost Locket, Found Locket (20 March 1970)
Written by: Charles Hoffman; Directed by: Norman Abbott

SYNOPSIS: Jan receives a locket in the mail anonymously, and then it disappears as mysteriously as it arrived. Carol and Alice break in to Mike's office to see if the note came from his typewriter.

GUEST CAST:
Jack Griffin (The Guard)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is a sharply-written episode with mystery and intrigue. It's nevertheless shocking to learn that Alice has a favorite among the kids.


EPISODE 26 - The Dropout (25 September 1970)
Written by: Ben Gershman and Bill Freedman; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Greg gets an exaggerated sense of his athletic ability after Don Drysdale compliments his pitching. Mike and Carol have to convince Greg of the importance of continuing his education.

GUEST CAST:
Don Drysdale (Himself)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Since Greg is usually shown as level-headed and mature, it's a bit off character for him to be so fatuous here.


EPISODE 27 - The Babysitters (2 October 1970)
Written by: Bruce Howard; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Greg and Marcia are repulsed by the idea of them having a babysitter when Alice is busy for the evening, and they convince Mike and Carol to let them babysit. The parents decide to check up on them in the middle of their evening out.

GUEST CAST:
Jerry Jones (Police Officer)
Gilchrist Stuart (Restaurant Captain)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode really strains Mike and Carol's credibility. They don't dare leave the children, none of whom is younger than nine, in the care of their fourteen-year-old son and thirteen-year-old daughter?


EPISODE 28 - The Slumber Caper (9 October 1970)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Marcia's slumber party is cancelled when she gets wrongfully accused at school. The parents recant, but Marcia wrongfully accuses someone else in the process.

GUEST CAST:
Chris Charney (Paula)
Hope Sherwood (Jenny)
E.G. Marshall (J.P. Randolph)
Barbara Bernstein (Ruthie)
Carolyn Reed (Karen)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes and the best one of the second season.

WHO'S WHO: E.G. Marshall co-starred with Robert Reed on The Defenders. Barbara Bernstein, Carolyn Reed, and Hope Sherwood are the daughters of Florence Henderson, Robert Reed, and series creator Sherwood Schwartz, respectively.


EPISODE 29 - The Un-Underground Movie (16 October 1970)
Written by: Albert E. Lewin; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Greg directs a film about the founding of the Plymouth colony, but he is upset when the rest of the family wants to second-guess his creative decisions.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The whole family acts just like a normal family would, including Carol telling Bobby repeatedly to sit still during the screening.


EPISODE 30 - Going, Going ... Steady (23 October 1970)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Marcia pretends to like bugs to attract a budding entomologist, but Carol is taken aback when the boy asks her to go steady.

GUEST CAST:
Bill Corcoran (Harvey Klinger)
Rory Stevens (Lester)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The lesson not taught here is that Marcia shouldn't try to be someone she's not in order to attract a boy. Strange as it seems, the rumors Greg's heard about Harvey turn out to be true.


EPISODE 31 - Call Me Irresponsible (30 October 1970)
Written by: Bruce Howard; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Greg is hired as a messenger in Mike's office, but he spends too much time goofing off and neglects his duties.

GUEST CAST:
William 'Billy' Benedict (News Vendor)
Annette Ferra (Randy)
Gordon Jump (Mechanic)
Barbara Morrison (Drama Coach)
Bob Peoples (Mr. Peterson)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Greg is again out of character by being irresponsible, contradicting creator Sherwood Schwartz's dictum that the oldest kids be the most responsible.


EPISODE 32 - The Treasure of Sierra Avenue (6 November 1970)
Written by: Gwen Bagni and Paul Dubov; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The boys find $1100 in a wallet while playing ball, and they bristle at the suggestion that they share it with the girls.

GUEST CAST:
Victor Kilian (Mr. Stoner)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The episode is well done, but the central idea of the plot -- boys against girls -- is more reminiscent of the first season.


EPISODE 33 - A Fistful of Reasons (13 November 1970)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: A bully teases Cindy for lisping, and he beats Peter up for defending her. Mike teaches Peter to defend himself, but things get out of hand when Cindy tells many classmates that Peter will fight the bully.

GUEST CAST:
Russell Schulman (Buddy Hinton)
Ceil Cabot (Mrs. Hinton)
Paul Sorenson (Mr. Hinton)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes. Mike and Carol seem more charitable than real parents would be at Buddy showing up to see Cindy.


EPISODE 34 - The Not-So-Ugly Duckling (20 November 1970)
Written by: Paul West; Directed by: Irving J. Moore

SYNOPSIS: Jan is distressed when her first boyfriend is attracted to Marcia. She compensates by making up an imaginary boyfriend named George Glass.

GUEST CAST:
Mark Gruner (Clark Tyson)
Joseph Mell (Druggist)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is the first episode to deal with Jan as the "emotional middle daughter." The competition between Jan and Marcia developed here is revisited in later episodes.


EPISODE 35 - The Tattletale (4 December 1970)
Written by: Sam Locke and Milton Pascal; Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: Cindy upsets the family by relating the details of other people's conversations. This causes a serious problem for Alice when Cindy tells her boyfriend some misleading information.

GUEST CAST:
John Wheeler (Postman)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The idea of Cindy as the inquisitive mascot of the family is brought out here. Cindy's quite literal application of the order not to tattle -- not even on the dog -- foreshadows the "exact words" theme of "Greg Gets Grounded."

DID YOU KNOW? Susan Olsen hates this episode with a passion. She was ostracized at school the Monday after it aired.


EPISODE 36 - What Goes Up (11 December 1970)
Written by: William Raynor and Myles Wilder; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: Bobby suffers a sprained ankle in an initiation ritual, and he develops a fear of heights, which his new parakeet helps him overcome.

GUEST CAST:
Jimmy Bracken (Jimmy)
Sean Kelly (Tim)
Brian Tochi (Tommy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Bobby's fear of heights is quite rational given his situation, but why is the parakeet never seen again?


EPISODE 37 - Confessions, Confessions (18 December 1970)
Written by: Brad Radnitz; Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: The other children each confess to breaking Carol's favorite vase ("Mom always says, 'don't play ball in the house.'") in order to prevent Peter from getting grounded and missing a camping trip. The parents put Peter in charge of doling out punishments to the others.

GUEST CAST:
Snag Werris (Hardware Man)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Being grounded seems a rather harsh punishment for a mere broken vase.


EPISODE 38 - The Impractical Joker (1 January 1971)
Written by: Burt Styler; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Jan's practical joking gets out of hand when she misplaces the mouse Greg is using for a science project and Alice hires an exterminator.

GUEST CAST:
Leonard Bremen (Exterminator)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Alice's sadness at the death of Myron seems genuine. But why would the "emotional middle daughter" be willing to handle a mouse? The producers were obviously still massaging the Jan character.


EPISODE 39 - Where There's Smoke (8 January 1971)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: After Greg is caught smoking but promises to give up the habit, Carol's ability as a parent is challenged when cigarettes are found in Greg's jacket.

GUEST CAST:
Marie Denn (Mrs. Johnson)
Craig Hundley (Tommy)
Gary Marsh (Phil)
Bobby Kramer (Johnny)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Tommy's mother is ideal as an authoritarian parent, the antithesis of Carol.

DID YOU KNOW? Barry Williams started smoking as a result of the smoking he did on this episode, a habit that lasted nearly a dozen years.


EPISODE 40 - Will the Real Jan Brady (15 January 1971)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Bill Freedman; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Jan decides to try out different looks, including a curly brown wig, after deciding she's too plain to attract boys.

GUEST CAST:
Pamelyn Ferdin (Lucy)
Marcia Wallace (Saleswoman)
Karen Foulkes (Margie)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: It actually makes sense that the opposite of "all of them had hair of gold" would be a curly brown wig.

WHO'S WHO: Pam Ferdin has a famous voice - she was well known for her voiceover work in cartoons. She also had a recurring role as Jack Klugman's daughter on The Odd Couple.


EPISODE 41 - The Drummer Boy (22 January 1971)
Written by: Tom and Helen August; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Bobby takes up drumming, which drives the Bunch to distraction, while Peter's masculinity is questioned because of his participating in a choir.

GUEST CAST:
David "Deacon" Jones (Himself)
Bart La Rue (Coach)
Jimmy Bracken (Larry)
Dennis McDougall (Freddy)
Pierre Williams (Jimmy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Although there are several story lines going, this is a weak plot, probably built around the celebrity athlete, and not helped by excessive drum noises.


EPISODE 42 - Coming Out Party (29 January 1971)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Cindy comes down with tonsillitis in advance of a planned outing on Mike's boss's boat, but Carol threatens to scuttle the whole affair after insulting the boat.

GUEST CAST:
Jack Collins (Mr. Phillips)
John Howard (Dr. Howard)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Why Carol would look forward to a boat ride after the disaster of "Mike's Horror-Scope" is a mystery, but the episode flows nicely.

DID YOU KNOW? Barry Williams incorrectly states in his Growing Up Brady (and I repeated the error in the first edition of this episode guide) that the doctor used the same tongue depressor on both Carol and Cindy. In the scene, you can clearly hear him getting a new tongue depressor in between the examinations.


EPISODE 43 - Our Son, the Man (5 February 1971)
Written by: Albert E. Lewin; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Greg decides to leave childhood behind, and he dresses "mod," turns Mike's den into a swinging pad, and tries to date older girls at school.

GUEST CAST:
Chris Beaumont (The Boy)
Julie Cobb (The Girl)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes, and a Brady classic by any yardstick. The hippie/psychedelic mode was already passe by the time this was made.

WHO'S WHO: Julie Cobb would go on to play the mother on Charles in Charge.


EPISODE 44 - The Liberation of Marcia Brady (12 February 1971)
Written by: Charles Hoffman; Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: Marcia joins the previously all-male Frontier Scouts after a TV interview prompts her to consider gender relations in her household; to retaliate, Peter joins the Sunflower Girls.

GUEST CAST:
Ken Jones (Interviewer)
John Lawrence (The Man)
Ken Sansom (Stan Jacobsen)
Claire Wilcox (Judy Winters)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This time boys vs. girls is considered in light of larger societal trends.


EPISODE 45 - Lights Out (19 February 1971)
Written by: Bruce Howard; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Cindy develops a fear of the dark after seeing a magician make a woman disappear. As therapy, she becomes the assistant in Peter's magic act.

GUEST CAST:
Snag Werris (Store Owner)
C. Lindsay Workman (Schoolteacher)
Joseph Tatner (Warren)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Another phobia episode coming so quickly on the heels of "What Goes Up...," this is nevertheless a very well-crafted episode, and Cindy's overcoming her fear is superior to Bobby's in the earlier episode, because she decided to confront her fear while Bobby merely forgot about his.


EPISODE 46 - The Winner (26 February 1971)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Robert Reed

SYNOPSIS: Bobby is depressed at being the only member of the family to have never won a trophy. He sets off to find a way to win one.

GUEST CAST:
Kerry MacLane (Boy)
Hal Smith (Kartoon King)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode would have been a lot better if Bobby had succeeded.


EPISODE 47 - Double Parked (5 March 1971)
Written by: Skip Webster; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: The rest of the Bunch leads an effort to save the neighborhood park from the development of a new courthouse, but their activism causes trouble for Mike at work, because his firm is building the courthouse.

GUEST CAST:
Jack Collins (Mr. Phillips)
Jackie Coogan (Man)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A very good episode with multiple layers of plot.

WHO'S WHO: Former child star Jackie Coogan had a meatier role in Episode 72, "The Fender Benders."


EPISODE 48 - Alice's September Song (12 March 1971)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The Bradys are suspicious when an old flame of Alice's appears on the scene, and even more suspicious when he asks her to make an investment.

GUEST CAST:
Stephen Dunne (Mark Millard)
Allan Melvin (Sam)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the few episodes to focus on Alice, it suffers by making her a sap.


EPISODE 49 - Tell It Like It Is (26 March 1971)
Written by: Charles Hoffman; Directed by: Terry Becker

SYNOPSIS: Carol writes a magazine piece on Brady family life, which is rejected. She then revises the piece into an idyll, which is also rejected.

GUEST CAST:
Jonathan Hole (Willie Witherspoon)
Richard Simmons (Mr. Delafield)
Elaine Swann (Nora Maynard)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode does a fairly good job of using the family as examples in Carol's writing.


EPISODE 50 - Ghost Town, U.S.A. (17 September 1971)
Written by: Howard Leeds; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The Bradys set off on a trip to the Grand Canyon, but they are locked in a ghost town jail and have their car and tent trailer stolen.

GUEST CAST:
Jim Backus (Zaccariah)
Hoke Howell (Gas Station Attendant)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The point of complication comes rather late in the episode, but the cliff-hanger is a good one.

WHO'S WHO: Jim Backus, TV's Mr. Magoo, is best known for playing Thurston Howell III on Gilligan's Island. He also played Mike's boss on the fifth season episode "The Hustler."


EPISODE 51 - Grand Canyon or Bust (24 September 1971)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The Bradys visit Grand Canyon, but Bobby and Cindy disappear as darkness approaches.

GUEST CAST:
Jim Backus (Zaccariah)
Michele Campo (Jimmy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The prospector's change of heart seems too weird; why was he in front with Mike and not in the back tied up?


EPISODE 52 - The Brady Braves (1 October 1971)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: The Bradys are initiated into an Indian tribe on their last night in Grand Canyon, after an Indian boy and his grandfather reunite the family with Bobby and Cindy.

GUEST CAST:
Jay Silverheels (Chief Eagle Cloud)
Michele Campo (Jimmy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The ritual ceremony is too much of a denouement tacked onto the three-parter.

WHO'S WHO: Jay Silverheels is best known for playing Tonto, the Lone Ranger's sidekick.


EPISODE 53 - The Wheeler Dealer (8 October 1971)
Written by: Bill Freedman and Ben Gershman; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Greg buys a lemon of a car from a slick classmate and considers a fast sale to an even greener buddy.

GUEST CAST:
Chris Beaumont (Eddie)
Charles Martin Smith (Ronnie)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This plot illustrates that Greg is just too nice to be nasty.


EPISODE 54 - My Sister, Benedict Arnold (15 October 1971)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Greg is furious that Marcia is dating his football rival, and he responds by pursuing the girl who beat her out for head cheerleader.

GUEST CAST:
Gary Rist (Warren)
Sheri Cowart (Kathy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Greg and Marcia using other people to get back at each other is seriously out of character.


EPISODE 55 - The Personality Kid (22 October 1971)
Written by: Ben Starr; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Peter is convinced he has no personality and so tries developing a series of personalities derived from famous people.

GUEST CAST:
Monika Ramirez (Kyle)
Margie DeMeyer (Judy)
Jay Kocen (Boy #1)
Pierre A. Williams (Boy #2)
Karen Peters (Susie)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The flip side to "Will the Real Jan Brady," this episode developing Peter as another "emotional middle child" is not much better.


EPISODE 56 - Juliet Is the Sun (29 October 1971)
Written by: Brad Radnitz; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Marcia is cast as the lead in the junior high school production of "Romeo and Juliet," but the role goes to her head.

GUEST CAST:
Lois Newman (Miss Goodwin)
Randy Case (Harold)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Marcia's exaggerated sense of self might be typical for a teenage diva, but the thought of Carol and the director plotting behind her back is unsettling.


EPISODE 57 - And Now a Word from Our Sponsor (5 November 1971)
Written by: Albert E. Lewin; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: The Bradys are recruited to act in a TV commercial by a quirky director. The family hires an even more quirky woman actor to help them prepare.

GUEST CAST:
Paul Winchell (Skip Farnum)
Bonnie Boland (Myrna)
Leonard Bremen (Truck Driver)
Art Lewis (Felder)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This was a downright funny episode, one of the funniest of the season. The acting seems to be intentionally overdone by everyone.


EPISODE 58 - The Private Ear (12 November 1971)
Written by: Michael Morris; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Peter disrupts the other children by eavesdropping on their private conversations with Mike's tape recorder. Greg and Marcia get even after deciding that Mike and Carol's punishment was too lenient.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The notion that Mike and Carol would really go ahead with the surprise party perhaps fueled the desire of many children to run away and live with the Bradys.


EPISODE 59 - Her Sister's Shadow (19 November 1971)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Phil Leslie (teleplay); Al Schwartz and Ray Singer (story); Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: Jan becomes overwhelmed by constant references to Marcia's accomplishments in her life. She wins a school essay contest, but faces a moral dilemma after learning hers was not really the winner.

GUEST CAST:
Peggy Doyle (Teacher)
Gwen Van Dam (Mrs. Watson)
C. Lindsay Workman (Principal)
Julie Reese (Kathy)
Nancy Gillette (Pompom Girl)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the classic Brady episodes, it's unfortunately better remembered for Jan's tirades against "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia" instead of Jan's level-headed handling of the essay problem.


EPISODE 60 - Click (26 November 1971)
Written by: Tom and Helen August; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Greg competes to be on the first-string football team, but wants to keep playing after a mild injury at a practice game. Meanwhile, Bobby tries to equal Greg's photographic ability but mostly annoys everyone with Gotcha! photos.

GUEST CAST:
Bart La Rue (Coach)
Elvera Roussel (Linette Carter)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode is outstanding for its integration of the subplot with the main plot. The idea, frequently explored on the show, that friends are mostly interested in superficial things, gets another airing.


EPISODE 61 - Getting Davy Jones (10 December 1971)
Written by: Phil Leslie and Al Schwartz; Directed by: Oscar Rudolph

SYNOPSIS: Marcia becomes determined to have Davy Jones appear at a school function and goes so far as to break into his hotel room to do so.

GUEST CAST:
Davy Jones (Himself)
Tina Andrews (Doreen)
Kimberly Beck (Laura)
Britt Leach (Manager)
Whitney Rydbeck (Page)
Marcia Wallace (Mrs. Robbins)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode would be better were it not for the extreme silliness of Marcia's attempts to meet Davy Jones.

WHO'S WHO: Marcia Wallace, who played Marcia's teacher in this episode, went on to play receptionist Carol Kester Bondurant on The Bob Newhart Show, and she now plays Bart Simpson's teacher, Mrs. Krabappel.


EPISODE 62 - The Not-So-Rose-Colored Glasses (24 December 1971)
Written by: Bruce Howard; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: Jan is distressed at having to wear glasses, and the situation becomes dire when her failure to do so ruins Mike's anniversary gift to Carol.

GUEST CAST:
Robert Nadder (Mr. Gaylord)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: An extraordinary well-crafted and memorable episode.

WHO'S WHO: Robert Nadder also played the salesman in "Amateur Night."


EPISODE 63 - The Teeter-Totter Caper (31 December 1971)
Written by: Joel Kane and Jack Lloyd; Directed by: Russ Mayberry

SYNOPSIS: Miffed at being excluded from a relative's wedding, Bobby and Cindy decide to set the world's teeter-totter record to prove that kids can be useful too.

GUEST CAST:
Dick Winslow (Winters)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode perhaps best exemplifies the spirit of the later seasons that the children come off best when they work together rather than compete.


EPISODE 64 - Big Little Man (7 January 1972)
Written by: Skip Webster; Directed by: Robert Reed

SYNOPSIS: Bobby is put off by his small stature; Greg is hired as a delivery boy by Sam the butcher.

GUEST CAST:
Allan Melvin (Sam)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Greg saving Bobby and then Bobby saving Greg (although it was Bobby who caused both crises) gives this episode a touch of sweetness not often found among raw meat.


EPISODE 65 - Dough-Re-Mi (14 January 1972)
Written by: Ben Starr; Directed by: Allen Burton

SYNOPSIS: Greg enlists the rest of the children to form a group to record his new "sure-fire hit song," but the group is threatened when Peter's voice starts changing suddenly.

GUEST CAST:
John Wheeler (Mr. Dimsdale)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Another of the show's most memorable episodes. But why was nothing ever mentioned of the group's recordings again?


EPISODE 66 - Jan's Aunt Jenny (21 January 1972)
Written by: Michael Morris; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Jan is elated to discover she looks exactly like Carol's Aunt Jenny at her age, but deflated when she sees what the aunt looks like now.

GUEST CAST:
Imogene Coca (Aunt Jenny)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The focus on looks is overdone; the parents don't tell Jan it's all right to look like Jenny, only that she won't necessarily grow up to do so. And Aunt Jenny's blowing through the Brady house is decidedly unsatisfying.


EPISODE 67 - The Big Bet (28 January 1972)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Earl Bellamy

SYNOPSIS: Bobby bets that Greg can't do twice as many chin-ups as he can, and the winner of the bet takes gratuitous advantage of the loser; meanwhile, Mike and Carol make a similar bet.

GUEST CAST:
Hope Sherwood (Rachel)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The tortoise-and-hare plot is predictable, and Mike and Carol don't set a good example by making the same bet.


EPISODE 68 - Power of the Press (4 February 1972)
Written by: Bill Freedman and Sam Gershman; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Peter is the columnist for his school paper, but he neglects his schoolwork and then tries to use his column to flatter a teacher who gave him a low mark.

GUEST CAST:
Milton Parsons (Mr. Price)
Angela Satterwhite (Diane)
Bobby Riha (Harvey)
Jennifer Reilly (Iris)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Peter is once again shown as a loser and a jerk. This will be a central element of his character by the final season.


EPISODE 69 - Sergeant Emma (11 February 1972)
Written by: Harry Winkler; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: A dual role for Ann B. Davis as Alice's Cousin Emma, a retired army drill sergeant who sets off to whip the family into shape during Alice's vacation.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Alice's "identical cousin" is as much a one-note as Alice is. The producers never developed the Alice character fully.


EPISODE 70 - Cindy Brady, Lady (18 February 1972)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Larry Rhine; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Cindy wants to act and be treated more like her older sisters, and Bobby tries to mollify her by paying her attention as a secret admirer. Bobby is cornered when Mike orders him to tell Cindy the truth, but he finds a way out.

GUEST CAST:
Eric Shea (Tommy Jamison)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes and the best of the third season. The tension between Cindy's wanting to be ultra-feminine and wanting to be a tomboy makes for great comedy.


EPISODE 71 - My Fair Opponent (3 March 1972)
Written by: Bernie Kahn; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Marcia helps a clumsy, plain girl become poised and attractive, but her efforts backfire when the girl decides to become Marcia's rival.

GUEST CAST:
Debi Storm (Molly Webber)
William Wellman Jr. (The Astronaut)
C. Lindsay Workman (Mr. Watkins)
Suzanne Roth (Suzanne)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The transformation of Molly is breathtaking, but the transformation in her personality is not.


EPISODE 72 - The Fender Benders (10 March 1972)
Written by: David P. Harmon; Directed by: Allan Barron

SYNOPSIS: Carol gets into a minor parking lot mishap with a crusty older man, and Bobby and Cindy maintain that the accident was Carol's fault. Mike leads a re-enactment of the accident before an appearance in small claims court.

GUEST CAST:
Jackie Coogan (Harry Duggan)
Robert Emhardt (Judge)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is a super episode and Jackie Coogan is great as a curmudgeon. The forensic reconstruction of the accident is superb.


EPISODE 73 - Hawaii Bound (22 September 1972)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: The family goes to Hawaii where Mike is involved in a construction project, and the boys find a mystery tabu in Honolulu.

GUEST CAST:
Patrick Adiarte (David)
Lippy Espinda (Hanalei)
Don Ho (Himself)
Sam Kapu Jr. (Himself)
Dennis M. Chun (Young Workman)
Elithe Aguilar (Hula Instructor)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: It does strain credulity that Mike's company would pay for the whole family (and Alice) to go to Hawaii. And the encounter with Don Ho is just too cute.


EPISODE 74 - Pass the Tabu (29 September 1972)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: The tabu is suspected of causing the family some instances of bad luck, and the boys set off to return it to an ancient burial ground.

GUEST CAST:
Patrick Adiarte (David)
Lippy Espinda (Hanalei)
Vincent Price (Professor Whitehead)
Cris Callow (Mandy)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The perils of the tabu are well done. And the spider scene perhaps encapsulates every child's worst nightmare.

DID YOU KNOW? Barry Williams was in fact injured while filming the surfing wipeout scene, and Susan Olsen, unable to swim, nearly drowned while filming the boat scene.


EPISODE 75 - The Tiki Caves (6 October 1972)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: The boys encounter a mad scientist en route to the burial ground, who accuses them of trying to steal the tabu from him.

GUEST CAST:
Lippy Espinda (Hanalei)
Leon Lontoc (Mayor's Representative)
Vincent Price (Professor Whitehead)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The Hawaii episodes are superior to the Grand Canyon episodes, but once again the ritual ceremony detracts from the dramatic experience. The mad scientist is too kooky to be believed.


EPISODE 76 - Today I Am a Freshman (13 October 1972)
Written by: William Raynor and Myles Wilder; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Marcia is anxious about her first day in high school. She tries to compensate by joining a host of clubs. Meanwhile, Peter builds a volcano as a science project.

GUEST CAST:
Vicki Cos (Kim)
Kelly Flynn (Tom)
John Reilly (Dick)
John Howard (Doctor)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the most memorable and well-crafted episodes. The best scene is not Peter's volcano spewing on Marcia's club meeting, but Alice seeing Marcia in her scuba gear.


EPISODE 77 - Cyrano de Brady (20 October 1972)
Written by: Skip Webster; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Peter enlists Greg's help in winning the girl of his dreams, but things go awry when the girl falls for Greg, thinking Peter was speaking for him.

GUEST CAST:
Kym Karath (Kerry)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes. Peter's frustration and later his expressions of concern for the girl seem genuine. This side of Peter should have been developed in the rest of the series.

WHO'S WHO: Kym Karath played the youngest Von Trapp daughter, Gretl, in The Sound of Music.


EPISODE 78 - Fright Night (27 October 1972)
Written by: Brad Radnitz; Directed by: Jerry London

SYNOPSIS: The boys scare the girls with special effects, and the girls retaliate. When Alice is cavalier about the whole business, the children decide to gang up on her. Meanwhile, Carol sculpts a bust of Mike.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes. It's beyond funny that the boys weren't expecting hijinks from the girls when they camped in the attic.


EPISODE 79 - The Show Must Go On (3 November 1972)
Written by: Harry Winkler; Directed by: Jack Donohue

SYNOPSIS: Carol and Marcia sing a duet of "Together Wherever We Go" at a school event, while Mike does a dramatic reading of Longfellow's "The Day Is Done," accompanied by Greg with guitar and Peter and Bobby with special effects.

GUEST CAST:
Allan Melvin (Sam)
Brandy Carson (Woman)
Frank De Vol (Father)
Barbara Morrison (Mrs. Tuttle)
Karen Foulkes (Muriel)
Bonnie Ludeka (Daughter)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Although the plot is a little thin, this becomes one of the more memorable episodes through the fine performances in the program.

WHO'S WHO: Frank DeVol arranged and conducted the music score for every episode and also composed the theme song and some of the score.


EPISODE 80 - Jan, the Only Child (10 November 1972)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Ralph Goodman; Directed by: Roger Duchowney

SYNOPSIS: Jan decides she'd rather be an only child, and she wills the other children out of her life.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This attempt at further developing Jan's alienation just doesn't work, since alienation is so contrary to the Brady mindset.


EPISODE 81 - Career Fever (17 November 1972)
Written by: Burt and Adele Styler; Directed by: Jerry London

SYNOPSIS: Mike is delighted to hear that Greg wants to follow in his footsteps as an architect, but Greg can't bring himself to tell Mike he wasn't sincere in those remarks. Greg sets out to prove that he couldn't design a real building.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode works fairly well, but shouldn't Greg have some other career idea at this point and not have to crib one?


EPISODE 82 - Goodbye, Alice, Hello (24 November 1972)
Written by: Milt Rosen; Directed by: George Tyne

SYNOPSIS: Alice quits as the Bradys' housekeeper after the children are callous to her. The children are crushed, and Alice's replacement isn't the least interested in being their friend.

GUEST CAST:
David Crigger (Customer)
Mary Treen (Kay)
Snag Werris (Mr. Foster)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A well-done episode that shows Alice as more three-dimensional than in most of the series; Carol's outrage at the children's treatment of Alice comes off as authentic.


EPISODE 83 - Greg's Triangle (8 December 1972)
Written by: Bill Freedman and Ben Gershman; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: Greg has to choose between Marcia and his new girlfriend for head cheerleader. Unfortunately, the girl is only interested in Greg because of his role.

GUEST CAST:
Tannis G. Montgomery (Jennifer)
Rita Wilson (Pat Conway)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A silly episode that shows Greg more naive than his character usually comes across.

WHO'S WHO: Rita Wilson grew up to marry Tom Hanks.


EPISODE 84 - Everybody Can't Be George Washington (22 December 1972)
Written by: Sam Locke and Milton Pascal; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: Peter is miffed at being cast as Benedict Arnold in a school play, after other kids at school identify him as a traitor. He tries to get removed from the play.

GUEST CAST:
Michael Barbera (Harvey)
Jimmy Bracken (Freddie)
Sean Kelly (Stuart)
Sara Seegar (Miss Bailey)
Barbara Bernstein (Peggy)
Cheryl Beth Jacobs (Edith)
Angela B. Satterwhite (Donna)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Yet another episode showing a Brady child in a theatrical experience. Isn't it understood that someone has to play the villain?

WHO'S WHO: Sara Seegar played Mrs. Wilson on Dennis the Menace.


EPISODE 85 - Love and the Older Man (5 January 1973)
Written by: Martin A. Ragaway; Directed by: George Tyne

SYNOPSIS: Marcia develops a crush on her dentist, and she gets the wrong idea when he asks if she's free a particular evening; he wants her to babysit.

GUEST CAST:
Allen Joseph (Minister)
Don Brit Reid (Dr. Vogel)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This episode is more memorable than it is interesting.


EPISODE 86 - Law and Disorder (12 January 1973)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Hal Cooper

SYNOPSIS: Bobby is appointed hall monitor at school and becomes overly aggressive at issuing citations. His lack of compassion is challenged when he finds himself breaking rules to help someone in trouble. Meanwhile, the family prepares a boat for launch.

GUEST CAST:
Harlen Carraher (Steve)
Cindy Henderson (Girl)
Shawn Schepps (Jill)
Jon Hayes (Jon)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is a fine treatment of the moral issues surrounding use of authority. The washing machine scene is overdone. (And why wouldn't someone simply open the back door?)

DID YOU KNOW? Barry Williams was high on marijuana when he filmed the scene where he first sees the boat. (He devotes an entire chapter of Growing Up Brady to this incident.)


EPISODE 87 - Greg Gets Grounded (19 January 1973)
Written by: Elroy Schwartz; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Greg is grounded after borrowing a friend's car while barred from driving, but he claims Mike's "exact words" did not preclude his driving other cars. Mike lets him out of the punishment but holds Greg to "exact words" otherwise.

GUEST CAST:
Hope Sherwood (Rachel)
Gracia Lee (Jenny)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes and the best one of the fourth season. Definitely one of the best remembered episodes. In some ways, a remake of "The Big Bet."


EPISODE 88 - Amateur Nite (26 January 1973)
Written by: Sam Locke and Milton Pascal; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: The children enter their singing act in a TV contest to win the money they need to pay for their parents' anniversary gift after Jan misunderstood the price.

GUEST CAST:
Stephen Dunne (Pete Sterne)
Robert Nadder (Alfred Bailey)
Harold Peary (Mr. Goodbody)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The best of the musical episodes. Full of interesting happenings.

WHO'S WHO: Hal Peary was "The Great Gildersleeve," a great character from the golden age of radio.


EPISODE 89 - Bobby's Hero (2 February 1973)
Written by: Michael Morris; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: Bobby causes a stir by idolizing Jesse James. Mike brings in one of James's victims to help Bobby learn the true measure of his hero.

GUEST CAST:
Richard Carlyle (Mr. Hillary)
Gordon DeVol (Jesse James)
Burt Mustin (Jethroe Collins)
Ruth Anson (Miss Perry)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Kind of a one-note episode. The murder scene is too slapstick, but then Bobby always had the most vivid dreams in the house.

WHO'S WHO: Burt Mustin played various old men on all kinds of TV series right up to his death.


EPISODE 90 - The Subject Was Noses (9 February 1973)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Larry Rhine; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Marcia breaks a date when she gets a better offer. Then, her nose swells up after being hit by the boys' football, and she suspects it causing the second boy to break their date.

GUEST CAST:
Lisa Eilbacher (Vicki)
Nicholas Hammond (Doug Simpson)
Stuart Getz (Charlie)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Perhaps the most memorable Brady episode. Unfortunately, another one that overplays the "looks are most important" angle.

WHO'S WHO: Nicholas Hammond played the elder Von Trapp son in the film version of The Sound of Music, and later played Spiderman on TV.


EPISODE 91 - How to Succeed in Business (23 February 1973)
Written by: Gene Thompson; Directed by: Robert Reed

SYNOPSIS: Peter can't bring himself to tell the family he was fired from a job at a bike shop; instead, he lets them believe he was promoted.

GUEST CAST:
Jay Novello (Mr. Martinelli)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Once again, Peter is portrayed as a loser. His confiding in Greg shows that alienation is foreign to the Bradys.


EPISODE 92 - The Great Earring Caper (2 March 1973)
Written by: Larry Rhine and Al Schwartz; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: After Cindy borrows Carol's earrings without permission, Peter helps her look for them before anyone can find out.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A rare cross-age pairing between Peter and Cindy. Downright charming and full of funny scenes.


EPISODE 93 - You're Never Too Old (9 March 1973)
Written by: Ben Gershman and Bill Freedman; Directed by: Bruce Bilson

SYNOPSIS: Dual roles for Robert Reed and Florence Henderson, who play Mike and Carol's respective grandparents, Grandpa Brady and Grandma Hutchins, whom the girls then scheme to unite as a couple.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: An all-around funny episode. Robert Reed is as stoic as Grandpa as he is as Mike, and Florence Henderson is as lively as Grandma as she is as Carol.


EPISODE 94 - You Can't Win 'Em All (16 March 1973)
Written by: Lois Hire; Directed by: Jack Donohue

SYNOPSIS: Bobby and Cindy are chosen to audition for a TV quiz program; one of them fails the audition and the other freezes on the air.

GUEST CAST:
Harlen Carraher (Clinton Boy)
Ed Knight (Monty Marshall)
Claudio Mart?nez (Woodside Boy)
Vicki Schreck (Woodside Girl)
Miyoshi Williams (Clinton Girl)
Tracey M. Lee (Woodside Girl)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The tortoise-and-hare plot is as usual, predictable, and the quiz show scene, unfortunately, is also predictable, as are Bobby's condolences at the end.

WHO'S WHO: Edward Knight is the father of Christopher Knight.


EPISODE 95 - A Room at the Top (23 March 1973)
Written by: William Raynor and Myles Wilder; Directed by: Lloyd Schwartz

SYNOPSIS: Without consulting the other, Mike and Carol separately promise the attic to Greg and Marcia for use as a bedroom. The boys scheme to make Marcia realize what a hassle the extra flight is.

GUEST CAST:
Chris Beaumont (Hank)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Once again, as in "Vote for Brady," Carol convinces Marcia to yield to Greg as the oldest. But why didn't Mike simply make the attic into two rooms?


EPISODE 96 - Adios, Johnny Bravo (14 September 1973)
Written by: Joanna Lee; Directed by: Jerry London

SYNOPSIS: The kids think a talent scout is interested in their singing act, but she's only interested in hiring Greg, and for deceptive reasons.

GUEST CAST:
Paul Cavonis (Buddy Berkman)
Jeff Davis (Hal Barton)
Claudia Jennings (Tami Cutler)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Although the plot is lame, the script is funny, and the two musical numbers (which the Brady Kids never put on record) are both outstanding.

WHO'S WHO: Claudia Jennings had recently been a Playboy playmate when this episode was made.


EPISODE 97 - Mail Order Hero (21 September 1973)
Written by: Martin A. Ragaway; Directed by: Bruce Bilson

SYNOPSIS: After Bobby tells all his friends that he and Joe Namath are good friends, Cindy misleads the quarterback into thinking Bobby is dying so he'll pay a visit.

GUEST CAST:
Joe Namath (Himself)
Tim Herbert (Herb)
Kerry MacLane (Eric)
Eric Woods (Tom)
Larry Michaels (Burt)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The whole thing is too fanciful, but Cindy plotting on Bobby's behalf seems to repay his favor to her in "Cindy Brady, Lady."


EPISODE 98 - Snow White and the Seven Bradys (28 September 1973)
Written by: Ben Starr; Directed by: Bruce Bilson

SYNOPSIS: Cindy takes charge of a production of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to raise money for a teacher's retirement gift, but the production is frought with difficulties and all the Brady kids want to play Dopey.

GUEST CAST:
Elven Havard (Policeman)
Allan Melvin (Sam)
Frances Whitfield (Teacher)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: It's nice to see Cindy as a leader. The staging, the plot, the dialogue, all make for an entertaining and memorable episode.

WHO'S WHO: Frances Whitfield was the actual on-set tutor for the children.


EPISODE 99 - Never Too Young (5 October 1973)
Written by: Al Schwartz and Larry Rhine; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: Bobby gets his first kiss but the girl may have been exposed to mumps. Meanwhile, the Bunch prepares for a Roaring 20's party.

GUEST CAST:
Melissa Sue Anderson (Millicent)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A memorable episode that showcases Bobby as more sensitive than usual.

WHO'S WHO: Melissa Sue Anderson went on to play Mary Ingalls in the long-running Little House on the Prairie, and some sources say her Brady Bunch appearance clinched her for the part.


EPISODE 100 - Peter and the Wolf (12 October 1973)
Written by: Tam Spiva; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: Greg is desperate to find someone to double date with his hot new girlfriend and her cousin. Trouble ensues when Peter pretends to be an older friend. Their dates decide to get revenge the next night.

GUEST CAST:
Alma Beltran (Mrs. Calderon)
Paul Fierro (Mr. Calderon)
Kathie Gibboney (Linda)
Cindi Crosby (Sandra)
Bill Miller (Len)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes and the best of the fifth season. The climax scene at the pizza place is too funny. Linda fulfills every male's fantasy for what a blind date should be like.

WHO'S WHO: Kathie Gibboney changed her name to Linda and starred in the soap opera Santa Barbara.


EPISODE 101 - Getting Greg's Goat (19 October 1973)
Written by: Milton Pascal & Sam Locke; Directed by: Robert Reed

SYNOPSIS: Greg hides the rival school's mascot in his attic bedroom before the big football game. Then he has to sneak the goat out of the house when an emergency meeting to deal with the stolen mascots is held at the Brady house.

GUEST CAST:
Selma Archerd (P.T.A. Lady)
Margarita Cordova (P.T.A. Lady)
Sandra Gould (Mrs. Gould)
George Wallace (Mr. Binkley)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: One of the ten best episodes, and definitely the funniest episode ever. The whole thing is well crafted and especially well timed.


EPISODE 102 - Marcia Gets Creamed (26 October 1973)
Written by: Ben Gershman and Bill Freedman; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Marcia's job at an ice cream parlor leads to an exaggerated sense of her importance when she gets Peter and Jan hired to work under her.

GUEST CAST:
Kimberly Beck (Girl)
Henry Corden (Mr. Haskell)
Michael Gray (Jeff)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Jan finally triumphs over Marcia! One more reason the fifth season episodes are so unpredictable.


EPISODE 103 - My Brother's Keeper (2 November 1973)
Written by: Michael Morris; Directed by: Ross Bowman

SYNOPSIS: Peter vows to be Bobby's slave for life after Bobby saves him from a falling paint bucket.

GUEST CAST: None

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This plot had already been done in both "The Big Bet" and "Big Little Man." It isn't any more interesting by repetition.


EPISODE 104 - Quarterback Sneak (9 November 1973)
Written by: Ben Gershman & Bill Freedman; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Greg insists that Marcia's new boyfriend is only out to steal his football playbook, and Mike is worried that Greg's team is cheating after the book is actually stolen. Meanwhile, Carol's old flame comes to town.

GUEST CAST:
Chris Beaumont (Jerry)
Don Carter (Rich)
Denny Miller (Tank Gates)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Too unbelievable. The least credible scene is Mike dodging Tank's wild gyrations in the living room.


EPISODE 105 - Try, Try Again (16 November 1973)
Written by: Al Schwartz & Larry Rhine; Directed by: George Tyne

SYNOPSIS: Jan tries a number of activities, but she doesn't seem to excel at any of them, including tap dancing, in which she makes much noise and vibration.

GUEST CAST:
Judy Landon (Miss Clairette)
Ruth Anson (Mrs. Ferguson)
Darryl Seman (Billy Naylor)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Once again, one of the middle children is shown as inept.


EPISODE 106 - The Cincinnati Kids (23 November 1973)
Written by: Al Schwartz & Larry Rhine; Directed by: Leslie H. Martinson

SYNOPSIS: The Bunch goes to a new amusement park near Cincinnati where Mike has a business meeting. Greg tries to pick up a girl who works there, and Mike's business is scuttled when his architectural drawings are switched with Jan's poster of a cartoon bear.

GUEST CAST:
Bob Hoffman (Attendant)
Hilary Thompson (Marge)
L. Jeffrey Schwartz (Bear/Man)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The plot is extremely weak, but the change of scenery and atmosphere of fun make this a memorable episode anyway.

WHO'S WHO: L. Jeffrey Schwartz is the stage name of series producer Lloyd Schwartz.

DID YOU KNOW? Robert Reed saved the cast from a roller coaster accident during the filming of that scene. (Barry Williams deals with this episode extensively in Growing Up Brady.)


EPISODE 107 - The Elopement (7 December 1973)
Written by: Harry Winkler; Directed by: Jerry London

SYNOPSIS: The girls become convinced that Alice and Sam are eloping. Carol urges restraint, but she herself arranges for a substitute housekeeper during the suspected honeymoon.

GUEST CAST:
Allan Melvin (Sam)
Bella Bruck (Gladys)
Byron Webster (Reverend)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A mistaken identity plot was rare on the series, and this one was pretty thin.


EPISODE 108 - Miss Popularity (21 December 1973)
Written by: Martin A. Ragaway; Directed by: Jack Donohue

SYNOPSIS: Peter runs an aggressive campaign for Jan to be voted Most Popular Girl, but Jan makes too many promises she can't keep.

GUEST CAST:
Darryl Seman (Herman)
Jerelyn Fields (Shirley)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Once again Jan is portrayed in a negative light, only this time she's shown to be shallow and uncaring rather than emotional and unsuccessful.


EPISODE 109 - Kelly's Kids (4 January 1974)
Written by: Sherwood Schwartz; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: A pilot for a contrived spin-off, the Bradys' friends the Kellys adopt three sons, of different races. They struggle for acceptance from their bigoted neighbors.

GUEST CAST:
Ken Berry (Ken Kelly)
Brooke Bundy (Kathy Kelly)
Todd Lookinland (Matt)
Carey Wong (Steve)
William Attmore II (Dwayne)
Molly Dodd (Mrs. Payne)
Jackie Joseph (Miss Phillips)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The pilot for the spin-off isn't half bad, but it should have been a stand-alone pilot rather than a Brady episode.

WHO'S WHO: Todd Lookinland is Mike Lookinland's brother. William "Pop" Attmore was a Mouseketeer in the 1970s incarnation of The New Mickey Mouse Club.


EPISODE 110 - The Driver's Seat (11 January 1974)
Written by: George Tibbles; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Marcia bets Greg she can outscore him on her drivers' test. When a tie results, the Bradys set up an obstacle course to determine the winner.

GUEST CAST:
Herb Vigran (Examiner)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Marcia's anxiety is what a lot of people feel in her situation. Greg overplaying his hand on the obstacle course is what most people would do in that situation.


EPISODE 111 - Out of This World (18 January 1974)
Written by: Al Schwartz & Larry Rhine; Directed by: Peter Baldwin

SYNOPSIS: Greg pranks Peter and Bobby with a phony UFO. The prank gets out of hand when authorities are called to investigate the sighting.

GUEST CAST:
Frank Delfino (Herlo)
Sadie Delfino (Shim)
James Flavin (Captain McCaffney)
Mario Machado (Jerry Bridges)
Brig. Gen. James A. McDivitt (Himself)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: A silly episode with not enough plot. That's why Bobby's dream sequence takes so long.

WHO'S WHO: Frank and Sadie Delfino served as stand-ins for the children during the filming of the series. (A stand-in's job is to take the place of the actor during certain technical processes when the actor is not available. This is especially important for child actors who face severe restrictions in the number of hours they can work.)


EPISODE 112 - Welcome Aboard (25 January 1974)
Written by: Larry Rhine & Al Schwartz; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: Carol's nephew Oliver comes to live with the Bradys, but the Brady kids decide he's a jinx.

GUEST CAST:
Judd Laurance (Director)
Ralph Montgomery (Truck Driver #2)
John Nolan (Mr. Douglas)
Dick Winslow (Truck Driver #1)
Snag Werris (Hardware Man)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Oliver is introduced with a very thin script that doesn't show much of his personality. And how lame is that studio tour?

DID YOU KNOW? This episode was produced after the following one, and most stations show them in the order they were produced, not the order they originally aired. This is the only instance in the series where that causes a continuity error.


EPISODE 113 - Two Petes in a Pod (8 February 1974)
Written by: Sam Locke & Milton Pascal; Directed by: Richard Michaels

SYNOPSIS: A dual role for Christopher Knight, who plays Arthur, a new student at Peter's school who looks exactly like him. Trouble ensues when Arthur makes a date for Peter on a night Peter already has a date.

GUEST CAST:
Denise Nickerson (Pamela)
Kathy O'Dare (Michelle)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Although meeting one's exact double is more typical for science fiction, the episode is so funny that one can swallow the donne.


EPISODE 114 - Top Secret (15 February 1974)
Written by: Howard Ostroff; Directed by: Bernard Wiesen

SYNOPSIS: Bobby and Oliver become convinced that Mike is a spy when the FBI visits the Brady house, and they suspect Sam of being a double agent. Meanwhile, Alice thinks all the subterfuge means Sam is planning to propose.

GUEST CAST:
Allan Melvin (Sam)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)
Don Fenwick (Fred Sanders)
Lew Palter (Mr. Gronsky)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: The second mistaken identity plot of the season, this one at least develops Oliver as a sidekick to Bobby.


EPISODE 115 - The Snooperstar (22 February 1974)
Written by: Harry Winkler; Directed by: Bruce Bilson

SYNOPSIS: To punish her for snooping in her diary, Marcia convinces Cindy that the client who is visiting Mike at home is a talent agent looking for a new Shirley Temple.

GUEST CAST:
Natalie Schafer (Penelope Fletcher)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: This is a hilarious episode and would have been even better had Cindy (who was almost a teen) been closer to the age the original Shirley Temple was when she became a star. And Cindy's snooping had been an episode plot before.

WHO'S WHO: Natalie Schaefer is most famous for playing Lovey Howell on Gilligan's Island.


EPISODE 116 - The Hustler (1 March 1974)
Written by: Bill Freedman & Ben Gershman; Directed by: Michael J. Kane

SYNOPSIS: Mike's boss gives the family a pool table, but it backfires on him when Bobby becomes a pool sharp who can beat him at the game.

GUEST CAST:
Jim Backus (Harry Mathews)
Leonard Bremen (Truck Driver)
Jason Dunn (Hank Thompson)
Dorothy Shay (Frances Mathews)
Grayce Spence (Muriel Sinclair)
Charles Stewart (Joe Sinclair)
Susan Quick (Gloria Thompson)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Something of a remake of "The Dropout," but Bobby's pool skill isn't as out of character as his super-cool demeanor.


EPISODE 117 - The Hair-Brained Scheme (8 March 1974)
Written by: Chuck Stewart, Jr.; Directed by: Jack Arnold

SYNOPSIS: Bobby and Cindy become entrepreneurs, selling hair tonic and rabbits, respectively, but Bobby is in big trouble when the tonic turns Greg's hair orange the day before his high school graduation.

GUEST CAST:
Brandy Carson (Woman)
Ben Hoffman (Man)
Hope Sherwood (Gretchen)
John Wheeler (Second Man)
Barbara Bernstein (Suzanne)
Robbie Rist (Oliver)

AUTHOR'S REVIEW: Robert Reed thought this plot was so silly, he refused to appear in the episode, but the other cast members carry it off well. And Greg telling the girls in the beauty parlor that Carol was bald makes him seem like a typical teenage boy.

DID YOU KNOW? This is the only episode where the word "sex" is used.


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